Mumbai, Islamic Terrorism, and the Antagonism

Terrorism in India

Terrorism in India

The battle between the Muslim terrorists and the rest of the world is a strange thing. Even within this previous sentence, many would already disagree on how I put it (“Is it not rather the Muslim and the West, or even the West and the rest?” etc…). I live in Indonesia, the country with the largest Muslim population on Earth. Many took to the streets in protest of the Danish caricatures of Mohammed back in 2006, and many hail suicide bombers as martyrs, even teaching grade school students to raise their fists and scream “Allah is the greatest” on the sites of their burials… Suffice it to say that I am very well positioned within the sphere of the current “war”.

A very curious thing for me is how each side view the war: on one side, this war is seen as a war between civilization and an uncivilized Other, a war of universal human rights versus those intent on disrupting it. Many Muslims take this side, claiming how the terrorists are not real Muslims, etc… For the other side, however, this is — to use their diction — a battle of ideologies. It surprises me how intent so many of the Muslim communities are that the entire notion of universal human rights, etc. is another “Western capitalist” way of oppressing Islam, and that the real war is that between capitalism and Muslim ideology.

I do not think, of course, that they are completely wrong. What should be taken into mind is rather this inherent split — a Real antagonism, as Žižek, but also Laclau and Mouffe, would have put it (“society doesn’t exist”, etc.). There is no neutral, “objective” position from which to see the war, since every position is already part of the struggle.

Thus, to fully grasp the Mumbai incidents and the ongoing 9/11 aftermath of the global war, we should first and foremost understand that this very war is in itself structured around a traumatic kernel, a Real qua impossible intersection between the dominant humanist Western paradigm and the Muslim one. Every attempt to shut down the war based on certain values is already violent and doomed to fail since its very utterance — there can be no agreement between the two point-of-views. The Habermasian ideal communication is in itself a fantasy.

How, then, do we confront and handle this war? As a good Lacanian, my political standard would be that of an ethical act — a politics that traverses the fantasy of any possible mediation between impossible points. The first thing we should realize before attempting any solution to this problem would be that there is no objective point of agreement. Will, then, a full-frontal war be more effective? I would claim that it would be in vain, since here, perhaps more than ever, we are dealing with specters: the more we annihilate the physical enemy, the more we become paranoid that they grow stronger, that there remains an impossible kernel we can never destroy (from, for one side: a worldwide capitalist conspiracies for the Muslims; up to, for the other side: clandestine Madrasahs that train endless suicide bomber recruits, etc.)…

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One Response to “Mumbai, Islamic Terrorism, and the Antagonism”

  1. hi there old friend! take into account that the foremost problem is that many (or it’s likely to be: ‘most of’) muslimin in Indonesia (and other countries) do not know exactly what they did, meaning to say, they do not know about Islam itself. They do have a tremendous passion but a little knowledge of their religion basic principles. They said jihad, but they did not know what are the prerequisites before doing it (refer to http://www.almanhaj.or.id/content/1888/slash/0). They did suicide bombing, oh, if only they know the principle norm of this very noble religion: knowledge goes first than deeds (refer to http://www.almanhaj.or.id/content/1702/slash/0). So what to do? There is nothing but very urgent thing in Islam rather than knowledge.

    “Allah will exalt in degree those of you who believe, and those who have been granted knowledge” (Al Mujadilah: 11).

    “It is only those who have knowledge among His slaves that fear Allah” (Al Fathir: 28).

    And, one more thing bonnie, could you change your posting title, that–you see, Islamic terrorism is a fallacy statement (as you may recall that Islam never teaches its believers to do such harmful action!)

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